Wednesday, 31 December 2014

The benefits of Cress.



Ibn Al Qayyim (rahimuAllah) mentioned the health benefits of cress in his work 'Prophetic Medicine'. He said that cress was beneficial for, warming and softening the belly, reducing inflammation of the spleen when combined with honey, preventing hair loss, increasing appetite, asthma and clearing the lungs. He also said that if cress seeds are crushed and drunk with hot water, this is beneficial for colic and vitiligo (a chronic condition that causes pale, white patches to develop on the skin).

Cress (botanical name Lepidum sativum) is commonly known as garden cress and is closely related to mustard and watercress. It is an edible plant that, when fully grown, has a peppery flavour and aroma similar to mustard and watercress. It is typically harvested when very young, at the cotyledon leaf stage.

Garden cress contains significant amounts of iodine, iron, calcium, folic acid and vitamins A and C. It is also a source of phytochemicals and antioxidants. It's the iodine content in cress which is so valuable to the human body in today's day and age.

According to a study funded by Australia's Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC), the anti cancer effects of garden cress far outweighed that of other green vegetables tested (the study was conducted on cress vs. some common species of brassicas).


How to Grow Cress.


Cress is very easy to grow. It can be grown all year round in any country, indoors or in the garden in Spring. When grown indoors, either seed trays or wet cotton wool in pots are usually used. It is often grown by children as their first introduction to gardening.

To grow cress in seed trays, lightly sprinkle the seeds onto wet cotton wool or a few layers of wet kitchen paper. Keep the seeds moist throughout germination and place the tray in a bright spot, like a south facing windowsill.

The seeds should begin to sprout in around 2 days. Insha'Allah in 5-7 days, the cress should be ready to harvest.

How to use cress.


Both the leaves and stems of cress can be eaten raw in salads or sandwiches, and are sometimes called cress sprouts. They are delicious and as with all sprouted seeds, they are loaded with vitamins and minerals. Eating raw garden cress is beneficial for women with irregular or suppressed menstruation. It is also very beneficial for them when cooked in soups.

According to Ibn Al Qayyim (rahimuAllah) for the treatment of hair loss, the juice of young garden cress is massaged on the scalp and hair. It can be extracted using a juicer. It is also beneficial for hair loss if it is consumed.

The crushed seeds can be steeped in boiling water for 10 mins and drunk as a hot infusion for the treatment of viscous phlegm build up in the chest and lungs (bronchitis, chest infections) by helping the patient cough it out. This decoction also benefits asthma sufferers as does eating raw cress in general.

According to Ibn Al Qayyim (rahimuAllah), patients with sciatica can make a pomade of cress leaves, barley stems and halaal vinegar (blend them to a paste in a food processor) and apply this mixture to the affected area, wrapping it with cling film so that it does not dry out. My personal advice is to leave it for an hour, then wash it off. Used with Hijaama wet cupping, Allah will bring relief insha'Allah.

2 comments:

  1. Islam also says there is a cure for every disease. I believe there is a cure for Vitiligo in that case and its all in the stomach.

    ReplyDelete

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